The impact of a sponsor’s generosity on children multiplies far beyond their childhood years. Compassion centres at local churches offer them safe spaces to learn and teach them lessons to nurture their God-given talents.

Access to resources and exposure to various activities, coupled with vocational and financial training, allow children to dream big—beyond their circumstances. Tearfund’s partner, Compassion, is devoted to cultivating and developing this next generation of leaders.

Check out these incredible stories of talented young entrepreneurs!


Faida – Guitar Teacher


MicrosoftTeams-image-(2).pngFaida runs an online music school. 

Compassion graduate, Faida, 28, discovered his musical talent at a Compassion centre in Rwanda at just 10 years old. He never missed a lesson. After graduating from university with a degree in civil engineering and buying a guitar, he deeply desired to give back to children. Today, he runs his online music school, where he has taught over 200 kids to play the guitar. “Whenever I remember that Compassion helped to boost my talent in playing the guitar, I get full of emotion, and I believe that it was God’s plan for me.”


Miriam and Maureen – Business Owners


MicrosoftTeams-image-(3).pngMiriam and Maureen owns their own salon business.

Twins, Miriam and Maureen, witnessed their factory-working mother working long hours but still struggling to put them through school, feed them and pay rent. This inspired them to seek a different future. Today, they are realising their childhood dream of owning a business in Tanzania. Maureen explains, “The [Compassion] centre gave us the capital for our salon business, and they also put us through entrepreneurial skills training.” The twins now manage their successful beauty salon and plan to open a men’s clothing boutique.


Theophile – Shoemaker 


MicrosoftTeams-image-(4).pngTheophile manages his own shoemaking business.

Bright and driven, Theophile discovered his talent for shoemaking at his Compassion centre in Togo. The teenager is at the top of his academic class and enjoys managing his small shoemaking business in his free time. In his language, he is known as a “toto,” or “fast learner.” He jumps to partake in every opportunity offered at the centre, but he chose to run with this one.


Sebastian – Weaver 


MicrosoftTeams-image-(5).pngSebastian runs a bag weaving business. 

In Rwanda, university education is often too expensive. Knowing this, Sebastian’s Compassion centre teaches vocational skills. Wanting to prove that boys could weave too, although it’s commonly done by girls, Sebastian chose bag weaving. He now uses the skills he learned to train his peers, earning him a monthly income. He also taught his mother to weave and sell her creations, further improving their family’s living conditions.

Related posts

Why you should support a Modern Slavery Act in New Zealand

Why you should support a Modern Slavery Act in New Zealand

Tuesday, 17 May 2022 — Morgan Theakston

The New Zealand Government has proposed legislation to address modern slavery and worker exploitation in New Zealand and internationally. But what does this mean, what is proposed and how can you help? 

Read more

Why does New Zealand need a Modern Slavery Act?  

Why does New Zealand need a Modern Slavery Act?  

Wednesday, 20 April 2022 — Morgan Theakston

You may be wondering if modern slavery happens in New Zealand supply chains or just overseas. Will a Modern Slavery Act be a burden on businesses? Can legislation truly create change? We unpack these questions in this blog.
 

Read more

Ukraine Crisis: The view from Poland

Ukraine Crisis: The view from Poland

Thursday, 17 March 2022 — Medair

As millions of Ukrainian refugees flee to safety, Tearfund’s partner in Poland shares their heartbreaking stories and helps them adjust to life on the other side of the border. 
 

Read more

Three beautiful short stories of the church in action during Covid-19

Three beautiful short stories of the church in action during Covid-19

Tuesday, 08 February 2022 — Compassion International

From Colombia to Educador to Uganda, here are three short stories from our Compassion churches we hope will encourage you!

Read more

Former Kiwi cop combatting Thailand

Former Kiwi cop combatting Thailand's dark underworld

Thursday, 20 January 2022 — Grace Ellis

Matthew Valentine spent 14-years of his life as a detective with the New Zealand Police. Little did he know his passion for fighting crime would take him to the streets of Thailand working for an organisation fighting human trafficking.
 

Read more

I regularly give to Tearfund, so what?

I regularly give to Tearfund, so what?

Friday, 22 October 2021 — Carl Adams

Tearfund’s ministry is about creating positive impacts in people’s lives but this would not be possible without the generous support of Kiwis.  Your donation is not just about how much money gets to where it is needed, but the level of positive change it creates.  I want to present impact through the lens of stewardship, and asking the question: “so what?”

 

Read more

Why periods are no longer a red light

Why periods are no longer a red light

Monday, 11 October 2021 — Compassion International

Today is International Day of the Girl Child where we recognise the rights and unique challenges girls face globally. One of the many challenges they face is period poverty. Millions of girls in developing countries experience shame, confusion and even stigma and discrimination when they get their period. The good news is in Compassion centres around the world, girls are finding education, protection, empowerment, safe bathrooms and period supplies.

 

Read more

Show more