1. The feast of diverse global and topical content


The conference had an incredible 115 speakers, contributing to a total of 34 sessions, to attendees from 23 countries. Just take a look at the breadth of topics: biblical justice, poverty, human trafficking, modern slavery, refugee crises, climate, immigration, racism, black lives matter, disability, being global neighbours, public narrative and justice campaigns, India and Covid-19, development ethics, gender and pay, justice, equity for all, the Doctrine of Discovery, peacemaking and more. All these issues matter deeply to God. It was a great way to engage them!

2. Our local speakers, Hana and Manny


As the producer for The Justice Conference in Aotearoa New Zealand, I was so proud to offer these sessions on a global platform. Hana Seddon speaks with such clarity and passion as she tells the story of the Church’s inspiring role in the formulation of Te Tiriti o Waitangi (The Treaty of Waitangi), and the sad reality of subsequent betrayal of that covenant as the land was unjustly sold or confiscated. Her challenges to apply principles from the Health Services and Outcomes Kaupapa Inquiry  (Wai 2575) inquiry will provoke thought and action. Her responses to the various questions in the Q & A time were razor-sharp. As well as being a true gem of a human, Manny Koks' session patiently negotiates various models of disability and wisely commends a model of Common Human Experience in which we all share a common vulnerable and limited experience and look to Christ alone as the truly human one. He also responded with incredible wisdom to all of the questions. Like Hana’s session, this one will provide a great basis for group discussion, personal reflection, or hopefully also organisational development.


3. Being challenged and engaging with difference


Justice issues have a prophetic edge to them, and prophecy is not always comfortable! This is why the prophets of old were so often killed. The messages are disturbing and it takes courage at times to let ourselves be challenged. I am also a big fan of growing in my capacity to engage with and hear from views that are different to my own. With 115 speakers contributing, it would be highly unlikely for all of these wonderful speakers to have the same view of every issue discussed. So the Justice Conference is not about a one-dimensional perspective on these issues. It is about getting into the conversation and letting the conversation lead to real action on behalf, alongside and with those who are most vulnerable, oppressed and marginalised.

You can still join now and watch this great content for a limited time! Head to www.thejusticeconference.org.nz and sign up or give access to a friend as a gift.

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