Thamina is one of many displaced by the Syrian conflict. On World Refugee Day, she shares her tragic story of hardship, but she also shares about the help and the hope she received from Tearfund’s partner.

My name is Thamina and I am 30 years old. I live with my husband and our three children (ages 17, 12 and 10).

Before the war, we were living on a farm in the western Homs province, Syria. We had a humble house, where we lived a safe and happy life. We had everything we needed thanks to our work in the fields. At the beginning of the war, our area was targeted by shells. The scariest and worst day of my life was when a shell fell on one of our rooms where my daughter Ola was asleep. The wall collapsed completely, and the debris fell on her. Ola was severely injured. Her neck was fractured, and her spine was damaged. She suffered from vertebral dislocation. That day has changed our reality forever.


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A church worker talks to Thamina outside of their makeshift shelter.

We spent all our savings on Ola’s many surgeries, but unfortunately, Ola’s health is still poor. She needs to continually wear a spinal brace and receive physiotherapy.

After a long search, we found some land to rent so we could erect our “tent”. The tent is made of old cloth and blankets like other tents around us. Unfortunately, this tent needs continuous maintenance. Rain leaks permanently and it is cold in winter, but there is no alternative for now.

My biggest fear is not being able to pay for my daughter’s medical treatment. We already lack her regular medication. I also fear having to move again if I can’t pay the rent. What made everything worse is the absence of job opportunities to hope for a decent life. My husband and I work as day workers on farms for very little income. We don’t have a stable monthly income. I desperately want my children to continue their studies and stay in school.

I met the church team (Tearfund’s partner) two years ago. After we informed the church about our living conditions, the church committee visited and provided tarps. The church also provided food baskets, blankets, shoes, clothes, jackets and toys for my children, a medical mattress for my daughter, medicine, and covered the costs of all our medical check-ups. The church is a permanent helping hand for us, especially in winter as there is no agricultural work. They help us with everything they can and they treat my children as if they were their own. The food baskets meet our needs and give us a sense of security.

I feel strengthened and happier, especially because of how the church people treat my daughter. I appreciate the psychological support they offer her. She keeps talking about the church to everyone she knows, and how the church has done everything it can for her.


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A church worker assesses the needs of Thamina's family inside their shelter.


I hope to get a good job so that I can meet our daily needs and save money for my daughter’s treatment. I pray that God will heal her and give me the power to provide everything I can for my family.

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