It's not every day you hear a birth story that features a motorbike and it's not every day you hear about a mum giving birth again, again and again in one day.

When 27-year-old Annet went into labour, she had no idea she would be giving birth to more than one baby that day. Her husband had gone to the city and she began feeling some pain that evening. Her son Samuel was born that night alone in her house. After Samuel was born, she had trouble cutting the umbilical cord and so jumped on a Boda (motorbike) with her sister-in-law to rush to the nearest medical centre. A nurse told a very surprised Annet that there was another baby on the way.

The nurse was concerned about the delivery, so Annet got on another motorbike, and travelled to a larger hospital for help. There, she had the first scan in her pregnancy and was told by the doctor there was not one, but two more babies coming! The doctor could see that she was losing strength and called her husband to ask for permission to perform a caesarean section. In Ugandan culture, twins are a blessing but triplets are a curse, so he said no. The doctor realized this was a life and death situation and performed the operation. Soon after, Grace and Patience entered the world, weighing just 1.8kgs each.

With a mounting hospital bill, the doctor who signed the paperwork didn’t know what to do, so he called TV, radio and newspaper journalists to take photos and put the news out about Annet’s situation. When the story went public, a Compassion staff member saw it and contacted the nearby project. Shortly after, some Compassion staff came to the hospital and helped Annet leave. At first, they tried to reconcile Annet with her husband and in-laws, but that didn’t work.



body3.jpgAnnet's former home.

For the last four years, Tearfund’s partner, Compassion, has helped pay for Annet to rent a home with her children, but recently, they outgrew the space (6x3m in size) and desperately needed another option.

Annet was given some land by her father but didn’t have enough money to build a home for her family. Compassion wanted to do something….

When thousands of Compassion sponsors heard about the situation, they responded with love and commitment. Over NZ$50,000 was raised to rebuild a safe and secure home for Annet and her miraculous triplets — just in time for their fifth birthdays!

Thanks to sponsors like you, Annet’s family has a new home—a place of security, belonging and safety and, they will never have to fear eviction again.


body1.jpgSamuel, Grace and Patience in front of their new house built by Compassion International and local church.

“In the past, I was always worried about the rent. Now I don’t have that problem. I’m feeling the peace of the Lord and through this house the gospel has come to life. People know Compassion built it for our family through our local church. We have the best house on the street!”, says Annet.

"The best thing about the house is the iron sheets [on the roof],” says five-year-old Patience. “In our previous house we didn’t have that and when it rained, we would get wet and we’d have to stand in a corner and wait for the rain to pass.”

Before their new home was built, the triplets shared one small bedroom with their mother and used the other room for meals. Just in time for their fifth birthday, the triplets received the best birthday present: news of a home with additional room to play!

“I love that we have so much more space,” says Grace. “Before, we were squeezed in one small room, but this house is spacious!”


body2-(1).jpgAnnet and her triplets. 

For Samuel, it’s simply the look of the new house that makes him happy. “The thing I like the most about the house is the colour,” says Samuel.

The generosity of Compassion sponsors has helped to provide Annet and her triplets with security, stability and independence. Annet spends her mornings tending to her garden, where she grows vegetables and fruit to sustain her family. “We are now in our own home and feel joy. We feel peace and happiness,” she says. “I thank God that He provided us with a house.”

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