Is it possible to give thanks in all circumstances, as 1 Thessalonians 5:18 tells us to do? Even after what the world has experienced in 2020? 

These grateful children who live in poverty prove it! The pandemic has increased struggles for almost everyone, and even more so for families in poverty. But these beneficiaries of Compassion’s programme are still giving thanks—specifically for child sponsors. Because of sponsorship, they are not going hungry like some people in their communities are. Because of sponsorship, they received the medicine they needed. Because of sponsorship, they have hope for tomorrow. 

Let’s find out what these kids around the world are thankful for, despite their circumstances. 

Reason 1: Sponsors 

These grateful children in Compassion’s programme are thankful that sponsors kept them in their care and prayers, even when everyone around the world was going through a tough time. Sponsorship provided them with sustenance and hope—as you’ll see in the beautiful photos below. 

Reason 2: A Full Belly 

A-Full-Belly.jpgBhorsha holding lentils and oil in Bangladesh.

Six-year-old Bhorsha holds lentils and oil—some of the groceries that have helped sustain her family during their most desperate season. Bhorsha and her twin sister, Asha, live with their solo mother, who lost her job after the coronavirus pandemic reached Bangladesh. 

The twins—whose names mean “hope” and “trust” in Bengali — and their mum received food and hygiene supplies. Because the sisters were identified as highly vulnerable children, their family also received a monthly allowance to make up for the lost income. 

Reason 3: A Safe Home 

A-Safe-Home.jpgDeneilis standing infront of her new family home built by Tearfund's partner. 

After her father lost his job, five-year-old Deneilis’ family was evicted from their home in Colombia. They moved into a two-bedroom home where 11 other people lived. Deneilis’ family had to wait for the others to go to bed before they could pull out old mattresses and sleep on the living room floor. When Compassion staff came to check on Deneilis, they were shocked by her low weight, skin allergies and living situation.

But thanks to Tearfund’s partner, the staff were able to build Deneilis’ family a new home. They painted it Deneilis’ favourite colour, pink. 


“I feel so happy with my new bed,” says Denilis. “I like everything in my house! Thanks to all who helped us to have our home.” 

Reason 4: Family 

family.jpgPawaret and his elephant in Thailand.

Pawaret’s elephant isn’t just a member of the family—it is also the family’s livelihood. Pawaret’s father, Jaw-la-tu, earns a living by giving elephant rides to tourists. Since the pandemic greatly reduced tourism in Thailand (and most other places), Jaw-la-tu lost his income.

A drought has also made food scarcer than ever for this family. Compassion staff have provided food and encouragement to the family during their difficult season. 

“We are so thankful for the Child Sponsorship Programme that never left us feeling alone. It’s like there’s always a family that cares for us in a hard time,” says Jaw-la-tu. 

Reason 5: God’s Love 

Gods-love.jpgDenke and her one year old daughter in Ethiopia. 

With no income and no hope of finding employment because of the pandemic, young mother Denke wondered how she and her one-year-old daughter, Koket, would make it. Denke and Koket are in Compassion’s Survival Programme in Ethiopia. At first, Denke didn’t realise how far the Survival staff would go to help them. Not only did Denke and Koket receive the food and medicine they needed, but the depressed mother also found spiritual and emotional support from the programme staff. 

“I am thankful for people around me, especially the Survival staff, who never get tired of supporting me,” Denke says. 

“My baby girl just turned one, and if you look at her, she looks like she is raised by a wealthy mother. She is healthy and strong.” 

 


Related posts

Why periods are no longer a red light

Why periods are no longer a red light

Monday, 11 October 2021 — Compassion International

Today is International Day of the Girl Child where we recognise the rights and unique challenges girls face globally. One of the many challenges they face is period poverty. Millions of girls in developing countries experience shame, confusion and even stigma and discrimination when they get their period. The good news is in Compassion centres around the world, girls are finding education, protection, empowerment, safe bathrooms and period supplies.

 

Read more

Haiti earthquake: to weep and to hope

Haiti earthquake: to weep and to hope

Wednesday, 08 September 2021 — Compassion International

As Haiti faces another devastating earthquake, Willow Welter from Compassion says, while it is time to weep with Haitians now, there is hope to rejoice as she reflects on what has been achieved by supporters since the last big earthquake occurred in 2010, which killed more than 200,000 people. With support, these communities will once again rise from the rubble and be able to rejoice again.
 

Read more

Four years on, we will not forget the Rohingya people

Four years on, we will not forget the Rohingya people

Wednesday, 25 August 2021 — Andrew Robinson

Today, August 25, marks four years since extreme violence and human rights atrocities erupted against the Rohingya people, forcing thousands to flee from Myanmar to Bangladesh. The Rohingya Refugee Crisis continues to this day, with over 880,000 refugees still living in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. We remember the Rohingya people today, and invite you to pray with us as you read our reflections on this crisis in this blog.
 

Read more

Kids around the world: My favourite foods

Kids around the world: My favourite foods

Friday, 20 August 2021 — Compassion International

We thought we’d ask some children who attend Compassion child development centres what their favourite foods to eat were. Here’s what they had to share.
 

Read more

Kiwi working to prevent human trafficking

Kiwi working to prevent human trafficking

Friday, 13 August 2021 — Keith Ramsay

Sean Hatwell’s experience as a detective fighting organised crime in New Zealand, took him to the streets and red-light districts of Thailand, working with Tearfund’s partner to disrupt trafficking rings peddling misery for victims of human trafficking.
 

Read more

A year on from the Beirut explosion, the effects are still being felt

A year on from the Beirut explosion, the effects are still being felt

Wednesday, 04 August 2021 — Tearfund New Zealand

Today marks one year since the devastating explosion at Beirut’s port in Lebanon killed more than 180 people. As one of the largest non-nuclear explosions ever recorded, it left hundreds injured and hundreds of thousands of people homeless and unemployed. Your support enabled our local partner MERATH, a Christian NGO in Lebanon, to help thousands of vulnerable individuals and families. Here’s what we were able to do with your donation.
 

Read more

My three top tips to becoming an ethical fashion consumer

My three top tips to becoming an ethical fashion consumer

Monday, 02 August 2021 — Juliette Epstein

When it comes to ethical fashion, there’s always a bigger picture. Here are three things I have learnt since being an ethical fashion intern at Tearfund. I hope these tips will help you think about how and what you're consuming and that my journey will help yours!
 

Read more

Show more