Reading 

Revelation 21:1-4 Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. 2 And I saw the holy city, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. 3 And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, ‘See, the home of God is among mortals. He will dwell with them; they will be his peoples, and God himself will be with them; 4 he will wipe every tear from their eyes. Death will be no more; mourning and crying and pain will be no more, for the first things have passed away.’ 

Reflection 

Over the years, I have watched quite a few time-travel movies. In almost all of them, you hear the familiar idea that in travelling back to the past special care should be taken not to change a single thing, even something supposedly small and insignificant, because of the potential effect it might have on the future. Yet I wonder why people in the present never think that a small change now could create a significantly different future. We know that small but significant changes over a period are significant, so why not begin to act now? John imagines the new heavens and new earth as a place that is renewed and restored.  John’s vision of a future where chaos and death are done away with, where flourishing is experienced is meant to comfort and instruct the Church about what is ultimately important and what we give ourselves to in the present that helps to bring about that future state of affairs. Revelation is there to instruct the community of God’s people with the hope that the church will be the embodiment of God’s future, the way it is meant to be, in the here and now! Revelation is not just about the future, it is about God’s people being faithful now, and through the ages.  

When thinking about consumption we need to think about the future. We need to think about Christmas! We need to consider the afterlife of the products we consume. Everything that we have ever consumed is somewhere. So where is it? Is it stuck in some dump, is it being reused? Has it been recycled? Turning to the future the key question is, will what we buy be able to be recycled, upcycled, reused or repurposed? Or will our purchases just end up in a rubbish dump somewhere, polluting the earth? When we think about the future, and the impact our choices will have on the future, what do we imagine? I’m hoping for a world where Christians used every opportunity, but particularly over these exorbitant periods of mass consumerism, to carefully reflect on the future of their purchases. Imagine the world we could begin to create with our small but significant choices. 

Prayer 

God of hope, we ask that your love may overflow more and more with knowledge and full insight to help us to determine what is best, so that on the day of Christ we may be pure and blameless, having produced the harvest of righteousness that comes through Jesus Christ for the glory and praise of God. Help us to make wise decisions that will help preserve the planet according to the future that you intend. Help us to be faithful stewards that will leave your beautiful creation for our children.  

Questions 

What are the future implications of my buying choices?  

What happens to this product once you are finished with it?  

Can our purchases be up-cycled, re-cycled, re-used, or re-purposed?  


Recent posts

Panit

Panit's story of surviving childhood abuse

Thursday, 20 February 2020 — LIFT International

Panit* has a round face and an easy smile. His skin has faded tattoos that a neighbour gave him when he was 10 or 11. After school, he sings in a choral group and even enters competitions. Panit spends perhaps too much time playing video games, staying up late at night, but he goes to church on Sunday and then comes home to do chores. He’s living the life of a typical, busy teenager. Panit is also a survivor of childhood abuse.
 

Read more

“They came suddenly, at night. It was a Friday.”

“They came suddenly, at night. It was a Friday.”

Thursday, 13 February 2020 — Medair

Rahim* always dreamt of becoming a doctor. As a child growing up in a small village in Rakhine State, in western Myanmar, he observed his uncle – a doctor – and decided he wanted to follow in his footsteps. However, Rahim and his family were forced to flee, leaving all their possessions behind due to the Rohingya crisis, and it seemed his dream of becoming a doctor was far from ever coming true.

Read more

The Extreme Jobs Of People Living In Poverty

The Extreme Jobs Of People Living In Poverty

Thursday, 06 February 2020 — Compassion International

Meet four people in Asia who do extreme jobs to feed their families. Though their occupations are harsh, they can teach us the dignity of work and the beauty of sacrificing to care for your loved ones.

Read more

The Boy Trafficked onto the Lake

The Boy Trafficked onto the Lake

Wednesday, 05 February 2020 — Compassion International

Ebenezer was exploited at just 8 years old. He was offered a job to work as a fisherboy on Lake Volta in Ghana. He accepted this offer because he and his grandma were desperate for money. But what he received was not what he was promised.

Read more

One person helped change the lives of three families

One person helped change the lives of three families

Thursday, 23 January 2020 — Grace Stanton

Imagine if you could talk to your child sponsor in their language. Imagine sponsoring not one, but three girls, and meeting them all for the first time after two years of sponsorship. Imagine what it would be like realising how much of an impact you were having on a family. The gratitude, the joy, the peace, and the freedom families experience through one person deciding to care for another young person’s life. This is Ly-Ly’s story.
 

Read more

What it means for a child to be known: Five-year-old cheats death twice

What it means for a child to be known: Five-year-old cheats death twice

Thursday, 16 January 2020 — Caroline Mwinemwesigwa

After escaping death as a child sacrifice, young Amuza from Uganda became a sponsored child through Compassion. His life was saved a second time when Compassion provided assistance with medical treatment for tuberculosis.

Read more

What it means for a child to be known: Soccer, more than a game

What it means for a child to be known: Soccer, more than a game

Tuesday, 14 January 2020 — Isaac Ogila

Growing up was not easy for Ciku. At an early age, her father died, and her mother turned to alcohol to deal with the grief and the stress of having to provide for five children. For Ciku, soccer was more than just a game, it gave her a purpose.  

Read more

Show more