There are an estimated 1.7 billion people around the world are in isolation today. But what about the people that are unable to self-isolate? The homeless, the unwanted, the refugee. What will happen to them? 

“Of course, many refugees and particularly any internally displaced populations live in make-shift camps, far away from any external official medical help. And those are the ones that are really very, very vulnerable” – Professor Richard Sullivan, Conflict health expert at King’s College London. 


 

In a Syrian refugee camp in Greece, they have;

 “one water point for 1300 people, one toilet for 200 people.” Apostolos Veizis – Doctors without borders. 
In Lebanon, Syrian Refugee Mohammed al Bakhas says,  

“We have one bar of soap each. We go to the pharmacy and facemasks cost up to 7,000 LL. (NZD 7.85). We can’t afford this type of thing.”  

With 80% of Syrian households in Lebanon living below the international poverty line, the cost far exceeds their ability to access even the most basic items such as soap. Their shelters are constructed of large sheets of plastic and tarpaulins. They have no bathrooms inside their shelters and share communal facilities. They are so crowded, that when someone breaths, their neighbour can feel it. 

These are desperate times, for very desperate people. When not if Covid-19 reaches the many refugee camps and slums, around the world, it will be catastrophic and the pressure on the medical teams already in the camp will be stretched.

Our local partners are on the ground working extremely hard to source and provide hygiene kits and basic medical care to keep refugees safe in the immediate days and weeks ahead.

With your help, we can fund that urgent work, help slow the spread of COVID-19 among refugees and minimise its impact on the world’s most vulnerable.

Covid-19 Refugee Crisis



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