The war in Syria has been raging for more than five years. As their streets are destroyed and they fear for their lives, millions of Syrian families flee from their homes, holding the hands of their children.

Slowly, unsure of the future and carrying what belongings they can, they make a daunting journey to bordering countries to live homeless as refugees.

How can you help?

  • Pray for an end to the conflict and for provision for the needs of those who are vulnerable.
  • Learn more about the conflict and help raise awareness about the seriousness of the situation. 

Tearfund is responding to the crisis as a member of the Integral Alliance


Our partner in Lebanon

Since 2011 our courageous partner has been working tirelessly on the border of Lebanon and Syria to help some of the millions fleeing their homes with nowhere to go. They tell us they're stretched beyond capacity.

“The humanitarian assistance available does not begin to meet the extreme level of need, and families are struggling for their survival,” they tell us. “We keep waiting lists of families who are in significant need...who we simply cannot assist due to lack of funding."

We can only imagine how heartbreaking it must be to turn away more families than you help. We invite you today to stand with us on the front line of this desperate situation. We invite you to join us in helping our partner and these families.

Join us in helping families devastated by the war in Syria

Donate today

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Note: If funds raised exceed Tearfund’s funding requirements for this appeal, your gift will go to our General Disaster Fund for future disaster response and preparedness.


Latest Updates

Your dollar more than doubled!

Monday, 07 November 2016 — Alex Carter

Thank you for your generous donation to Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Every dollar means so much to the families who are in desperate need. Which is why it’s even more exciting to announce that through the NZ Aid Programme, the Government has more than doubled your donations to our Syrian Refugee Appeal. That’s right, more than doubled.

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How? It all started with you.

In May, we announced the Government was going to match every dollar raised in response to the Syrian refugee crisis. We called. And you answered. By the end of June, you had donated over $200,000. By the time the appeal closed on 1 August, it was $338,714. Then, the government unexpectedly matched for funds raised in a prior period too – that’s $94,743 – and threw in an extra $48,731. That makes for a total of $913,696.

Your incredible support has meant that our local partner in Lebanon can help nearly 1000 of the most vulnerable Syrian refugee families make it through the cold winter months with regular fuel to heat their homes and access to food. We cannot thank you enough.

 

Visiting our partner in Lebanon

Thursday, 19 May 2016 — Alex Carter

Humanitarian Specialist Alice Banfield and Andrew Robinson are visiting our partner in Lebanon. Read more for their impressions, as well as a video from one of the locations in Lebanon.

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Humanitarian Specialist Alice Banfield and Andrew Robinson are visiting our partner in Lebanon.

“Today we went and visited four churches which LSESD works through to assist refugees, and for me this massively underscored the importance of this campaign. At all the churches we went to, the story was basically the same: They are helping as much as they can, but the need is huge. One pastor was distributing food vouchers (from our local partner) to around 80 families. He has 25 more in urgent need of assistance. He has refugees turn up at his house, asking for help.

Another church we went to is providing food vouchers for 86 families. They have over 1,500 on their books, and have had to stop registering people – but people still turn up, and they can’t really turn them away. They target the food vouchers to the vulnerable, but there isn’t really anyone who’s *not* vulnerable. If people can get work, they can earn maybe US$300/month. Rent is around US$500/month. As you know, most families have gone into debt just to survive.

The relief work is mostly done by church volunteers and/or Syrian refugees themselves (also as volunteers, with church oversight), so the capacity and the willingness is there – the only constraint it seems is funding.”

Alice Banfield, Tearfund’s Humanitarian Specialist

See Alice's report below:

Syria Crisis – Tearfund in Lebanon from Tearfund NZ on Vimeo.

The New Zealand Government is doubling donations for Syria

Wednesday, 18 May 2016 — Alex Carter

Foreign Minister Murray McCully has announced $2.5 million in matched funding for New Zealand based non-government organisations, to help scale up their response to the Syrian refugee crisis.

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Foreign Minister Murray McCully has announced $2.5 million in matched funding for New Zealand based non-government organisations, to help scale up their response to the Syrian refugee crisis.


“The fighting in Syria has killed more than half a million people and forced 11 million from their homes,” Mr McCully says.

“Neighbouring countries, such as Jordan and Turkey, are bearing the brunt of this refugee crisis and the funding we have announced today will help deliver practical support to displaced Syrian communities across the region.

The Government will match ‘dollar for dollar’ the funds raised by New Zealand NGOs running Syria appeals up to a maximum of $2.5 million. This approach acknowledges the generous support of New Zealand public and will ensure every dollar they donate goes further.

“Over the past five years we have steadily raised our support for people forced from their homes by the fighting in Syria and Iraq, and this latest increase takes New Zealand’s total contribution to $22.5 million,” Mr McCully says.

Delivering aid, followed by ‘cessation of hostilities’

Monday, 15 February 2016 — Phil Botha

The U.S and Russia have announced a plan of delivering humanitarian aid, followed by a ‘cessation of hostilities’ on the way to a more formal ceasefire.

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The U.S and Russia have announced a plan of delivering humanitarian aid, followed by a ‘cessation of hostilities’ on the way to a more formal ceasefire. This would be the first sustained and official halt to fighting since the civil war began in 2011, though the ceasefire would only be partial as it excludes designated terrorist organizations ISIS and Nursa.

Read more

Syria update

Wednesday, 10 February 2016 — Phil Botha

New Report from SCPR: 470,000 have died and 45% of Syria’s population has been displaced since the war began.

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A new report by the Syrian Centre for Policy Research(SCPR) has found that Syria’s national wealth, infrastructure and institutions have been ‘almost obliterated’ by the war, and that 470,000 people have died in Syria since the war began – around double the UN’s estimates. Also, 45% of Syria’s population has been displaced by the ongoing conflict.

You can read more here:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/feb/11/report-on-syria-conflict-finds-115-of-population-killed-or-injured

"End the #Syriacrisis"

Wednesday, 20 January 2016 — John Watson

You may see in the media in the coming days that humanitarian organizations around the world are working together in a co-ordinated campaign to appeal for an end to the Syria crisis. You can add you voice to the chorus by sharing or tweeting “End the suffering. End the #Syriacrisis”.
 

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You may see in the media in the coming days that humanitarian organizations around the world are working together in a co-ordinated campaign to appeal for an end to the Syria crisis. You can add you voice to the chorus by sharing or tweeting “End the suffering. End the #Syriacrisis”.

Syrian Refugees

Wednesday, 20 January 2016 — John Watson

More than four years on, the Syrian war is raging harder than ever and in its wake are the lives of more than 12 million people in need of humanitarian assistance – around half of which are children.

 

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More than four years on, the Syrian war is raging harder than ever and in its wake are the lives of more than 12 million people in need of humanitarian assistance – around half of which are children.

We’ve been working in the region with our local partners for more than 12 years, but in the last year our work there has stepped up like never before. It’s now reached extememely desperate levels. We need your help to reduce the suffering of children and families forced from their homes as refugees.

UN funding shortfalls have led to repeated cuts in emergency assistance to refugees living in camps. Food vouchers have been halved and the percentage of households living below the poverty line has increased to 70%. Families are buying food on credit and eating smaller meals, and children aren't recieving an education. This winter is very tough for them. 

Our partners are working with local churches in refugee settlements bordering Syria in places like Lebanon and Iraq to provide food, fuel and blankets for winter, medical assistance, education and child friendly spaces. The protection of children is especially important in situations where they are vulnerable as they are targeted by traffickers. 

In Europe, we’re working through the Integral Alliance to provide emergency support to refugees on their journey. In New Zealand, we’re asking churches to support refugee families in the resettlement process.

Tearfund's response to the Syria crisis

Tuesday, 06 October 2015 — Alex Carter

An in-depth look at what Tearfund is doing in response to the Syrian Refugee Crisis.

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In a disaster of this nature, Tearfund has a multi-faceted approach. Firstly, we’re working on the front lines of bordering countries where refugees are fleeing. Our partners are in refugee camps setting up child-friendly spaces to help prevent children from being trafficked or exploited. We’re also offering trauma support and counselling to help them through the trauma they’ve experienced. Through the local church, we’re providing education to thousands of displaced Syrian children who would otherwise be missing out on school while the war rages on.

In Europe, we’re working through the Integral Alliance, a network of 21 international aid and development agencies that come together in the event of a disaster. In a humanitarian disaster like this the Alliance also connects us into local organisations in Europe that are able to provide emergency support to refugees. Traditionally we don’t work in European Union countries but the enormity of this refugee crisis calls for an exception.

In New Zealand, we’re proud to have been supporting local refugee agency, Migrant Action Trust, as they’ve helped refugees and migrants settle in New Zealand. In light of the Prime Ministers recent announcement to accept more refugees, we see our work with them as being imperative to offering support from the moment refugees arrive until they become fully integrated into New Zealand society.

And finally, you’ll find us lobbying the New Zealand Government to increase the permanent refugee quota and match military deployment spend with humanitarian response funding.